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Posts Tagged ‘hackintosh’

Snow Leopard on Hackintosh Second Method

March 28, 2010 22 comments

In a couple of previous posts I mentioned having problems with my original Snow Leopard hackintosh install. Most appeared to be related to permissions, with certain settings reverting after a reboot. For example, I change the background colour of my finder windows to grey instead of white, and every time I restarted this would change back to white again. I also always got a few unrepairable permissions errors when using Disk Utility’s repair function. Nothing major, and while everything important worked fine there were enough minor irritations to start me looking at an alternative install method. Read more…

Security Update 2010-001 on Hackintosh

January 23, 2010 2 comments

Apple this week released Security Update 2010-001 for Leopard and Snow Leopard Systems. The Update offers fixes for CoreAudio, CUPS, Flash Player, ImageIO, ImageRAW and OpenSSL and is a recommended update for all Leopard and Snow Leopard Users. I have now had a chance to install and test the update on my main Hackintosh and can report no found issues so far, so anyone using a similar method of installation should be fine to install through Software Update.

Over the past week I have done a re-install of Snow Leopard on my main Hackintosh, following some small irritations with permissions on the original install. As usual I made a backup to another hard drive then imported my user account and applications once Snow Leopard was patched to 10.6.2. This time round I have used a Boot132 CD and Chameleon 2 RC4, so over the next week I hope to update my original Snow Leopard on Hackintosh guide and create a new one to reflect the new method.

Dual monitors with a hackintosh

December 28, 2009 6 comments

For the past few years I’ve used a Dell 2005FPW screen, which although reliable was limited by its 1680 x 1050 resolution. I’m using a full HD video camera and TV so the next step was a HD or better monitor for editing. I wasn’t sure if the 9800GT card in my main hackintosh would need software tweaks to support two monitors but a quick test with a spare 15 inch TV/monitor showed it worked fine. Just to recap, I’m using an EFI string for video card support with the default 9800GTX setting from OSX86Tools.

Next step was to choose a monitor. Since I don’t play a lot of games the main use will be video and photo editing, so I was looking for something with good contrast and black levels as well as reasonable colour accuracy. The target was HD or better resolution and around a 24 inch screen. The most common resolution at this size was 1920×1200 until recently, but these displays are rapidly disappearing to be replaced with 1920×1080 panels. All the comments I found on this give cheaper manufacturing as the reason. Read more…

Snow Leopard on Hackintosh Guide

September 12, 2009 45 comments

28th March 2010 – This install guide has been replaced by Snow Leopard On Hackintosh Second Method. The new install method is simpler and faster than this guide, but uses a boot CD that may not be compatible with all hardware.

Released on the 28th of August 2009, Snow Leopard is described by Apple as ‘Better.Faster.Easier.’ It’s a fairly accurate label, and once I got over my initial problem upgrading my Macbook the new operating system has been stable, fast, and a pleasure to use. The Family pack I bought from the Apple Store allows installation on five computers, so this covers my Macbook, original hackintosh, home cinema hackintosh (HTPC) and the Intel Atom server I recently built. I know the EULA doesn’t allow for installation on non Apple hardware, but I paid my £39 so I’m as legit as is currently possible.

Before I start listing the steps I took to get Snow leopard working on my original Hackintosh, it’s worth mentioning backups again. During the install I tried things that screwed up Snow Leopard and stopped it working correctly. Having a full backup meant it was easy to reinstall and restore user data. My recommendations for backup software are SuperDuper, which I bought a couple of years ago, or the excellent donation-ware Carbon Copy Cloner. If you intend to use Carbon Copy Cloner with Snow Leopard make sure you have the latest V3.3 beta 5, as I had major problems with version 3.2.1. Superduper version 2.6.1 is described as compatible with Snow Leopard, my testing has shown no problems so far.

Backups done, on with the install. I used a separate hard drive for my Snow Leopard install, and the first part is done from my existing 10.5.8 installation. There’s a great 10.6 Generic Retail Guide at Insanelymac that lists three methods of installing Snow Leopard on non Apple hardware:

  1. Chameleon bootloader with a hidden EFI partition
  2. Boot-132 Disc with a patched boot file
  3. Chameleon v2 RC1 USB bootloader with Netkas PCEFIv10.1 patched boot Read more…

10.5.8 on Hackintosh

August 28, 2009 2 comments

Snow_Leopard_BoxSnow Leopard is released today which means the focus of the hackintosh scene will quickly shift to the latest release. I picked up my Copy of the Snow Leopard Family Pack on the way home from work today and will by attempting a hackintosh install over the weekend, as a fresh install. My three hackintosh’s will be staying as they are until all the bugs are ironed out and Snow leopard is stable on non-Apple hardware.

My main Hackintosh, based on a Gigabyte P32-DS3R motherboard and Intel Core 2 Quad 6600 processor, is running 10.5.8. I had a problem with sleep not resuming after the install, but a quick search of Insanelymac.com showed a perfect fix by deleting disabler.kext and IntelCPUPMDisabler.kext from the Extensions folder. The same didn’t work with my newest Intel Atom server Hackintosh, in the limited time I have had over the past two weeks I haven’t found a fix yet. The HThackintosh hasn’t been attempted yet, as this and the server are not routinely web browsing or doing any other risky activity. Also, by the time the eighth point update to an Apple OS is released the urgency to upgrade is wearing off. These machines may stay at 10.5.7 until the Snow Leopard on Hackintosh guides are well tested.

As I always say, don’t forget to make a backup before upgrading any system, Apple or not, to Snow Leopard. My Macbook is currently being backed up to an external USB drive using the excellent Carbon Copy Cloner, as soon as I have the option to restore to Leopard from a backup the newest big cat will be going on as an upgrade.

Hackintosh Atom server

July 27, 2009 3 comments

In a previous post I told the sorry tale of my Synology DS106e network attached storage box. It served me well for 18 months until the fan stopped working and a scheduled backup led to the hard drive overheating. It was time to upgrade my server, and there were several options available.

  1. Buy a replacement NAS box, either a newer Synology model or something similar from Qnap, Thecus, Netgear etc. This would cost anywhere from £70 for a used item on eBay to £300 for a top of the range home/soho device. The current Synology one drive budget NAS is around £180 online.
  2. Buy a used Mac Mini from eBay. The newer Core 2 Duo/solo models fetch a high price but the original G4 versions at 1.25 or 1.4Ghz are selling for around £120. Ready made server in a small and silent box, easy to setup and expand through software.
  3. Build a mini hackintosh based on an Intel Atom processor. This is perhaps the most flexible approach, is should be able to run Leopard and hopefully Snow Leopard. Linux and windows shouldn’t be a problem either, so it has plenty of options for software.

I decided to go for the third option, not really surprising since I have already built a Quad Core hackintosh and a Home Theatre hackintosh. Building something is usually more fun than buying a ready made device, although this depends on how well the end result works. With the decision made I started looking at the Insanelymac forums for details from people who had already used Atom processors. Read more…

10.5.7 and Display refresh rates

July 6, 2009 Leave a comment

I’ve written previously about the setup of my HTPC and LCD TV, and this included setting the HThackintosh to the optimal resolution and refresh rate. Since then I’ve commented on the occasional small jumps in the picture, and after investigation I’ve put this down to differences in media frame rate and display refresh rate. Much HD content is 24 frames per second, which doesn’t go smoothly into 50 or 60 frame per second display refresh.

There are many threads in the Plex forums about using software such as DisplayConfigX to create custom display modes for refresh rate. There are also warnings that Plex has issues with display refresh rate and media frame rate being the same, resulting in audio sync loss. Auto switching display refresh rate to media frame rate is on the todo list for Plex, so hopefully the issues can be fixed. Read more…

HThackintosh Remote Part 1

June 7, 2009 2 comments

Keysonic_540_RFAfter building my Home Theatre hackintosh I used a keysonic RF keyboard/trackpad (above) for control, with the intention of adding a smaller remote control at a later date. Apart from size the keyboard is a pretty perfect method of control, equally suited to media centre duties, web browsing and general computer use. It is a bit bulky for just watching media, so the search began for the perfect remote. Read more…

10.5.7 on Hackintosh

May 16, 2009 3 comments

10.5.7

My main hackintosh is now updated to 10.5.7, using the 10.5.7 update dmg downloaded from the Apple web site. I could have used the Software Update install method which has worked just as well for the past couple of updates, but I have three machines to install on so it makes sense to download once. There appear to be no issues following the update, just the usual replacement of files that the update overwrites. Read more…

Mac Os 10.5.7 released

May 13, 2009 1 comment

Software UpdateApple has today released the latest update to its Mac OSX Leopard operating system. 10.5.7 offers the usual mix of bug fixes and security updates, and is available as an updater for 10.5.6 or a combo updater for any version of 10.5 Leopard.

Many components are updated in this release, including RAW image support, Nvidia graphic updates, Widgets, Finder network searches and printing. Knowledge base article HT3397 covers the update in greater depth. And for anyone wanting the last word in detail, Macworld has an article that lists just about everything updated.

My advice for anyone applying the update (hackintosh or macintosh) is make a backup before attempting. We all make regular backups though, don’t we? I’ve just had a 120Gb hard drive die that was fortunately used exlusively for playing games on Windows XP, but at just over three years old and light use it was certainly not an expected failure.