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Posts Tagged ‘eula’

Removing Google Software Update

February 15, 2009 5 comments

Much has been written about how far Google intrudes into your online privacy. I notice this when I use my Gmail account and have small targeted advertising links at the top of the page. Occasionally they are useful links so I don’t mind the small loss of privacy. That’s all changed with the latest release of Google Earth and Picasa.

I recently mentioned Picasa for Mac as a fast photo viewer and intended to use it alongside Lightroom for browsing photo’s. Google earth has been updated to version 5 adding lots of interesting new features. Both of these apps tie in with the Google Software Updater which is a background task claiming to exist only to regularly check for software updates.

My objection here is a having a resource consuming process that is out of my control and providing a remote service with information I can’t see. Most Macintosh apps have an easily controlled update check that runs at a user configurable interval or on app startup. Even Apple’s Software Update can be turned off easily. Google give you no controll over the update app, and don’t even make it clear that the updater is being installed. Several sites including ArsTechnica and Wired have covered this story in detail so I won’t go into detail. It all comes down to Google’s attitude that ‘it’s in the EULA’ so they aren’t doing anything the user isn’t told about. And we all read EULA’s before installing software, don’t we? Read more…

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Psystar Sues Apple, claims anticompetitive practices

August 27, 2008 Leave a comment

In an unexpected move, Mac clone maker Psystar has counter sued Apple, accusing the company of restraint of trade and other violations of antitrust law. Apple had originally filed a formal complaint with the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California on July 3rd. Now that Psystar has responded, Apple has 30 days to reply to the allegations.

Psystar are looking to challenge the EULA of Mac OSX, which states that the operating system can only be used on Apple hardware. It’s starting to sound like a David and Goliath battle, but if the comment on Engadget that ‘EULAs have traditionally been upheld in California and Florida’ is any indication Psystar has a tough battle ahead.

This is one case that could have a huge impact on the future of Mac OS, especially the right to run it on non-Apple hardware. The chance to buy a legal copy of OSX for a hackintosh would be a big improvement, even though it’s looking like a very slim possibility at the moment.

Read more at

AppleinsiderMacworldEngadgetTechradar

Are Psystar for real?

The debate on Psystar and their ‘Opencomputer’ platform of pre built hackintosh’s continues. A couple of days ago Cnet published a review after they managed to get their hands on one of the mythical machines. Today there’s another article discussing the legal implications of what Psystar are doing, and the struggle ahead of them if Apple decides to take legal action. Good luck in that fight, I would say starting a legal battle with a company that has 19.4 Billion Dollars in cash is suicidal. I’m almost hoping Apple do decide to take action if only to see how the EULA hold up. Companies have been restricting our use of the items we buy for some time now, so maybe it’s about time someone challenged that.

Reviewers are gradually coming around to the idea that Psystar may be legitimate, though I would still wait to hear of a reasonable number of computers shipped before buying one. I’m sitting on the fence here, as the OS X updates page at Psystar is still empty. Lets see what happens when the imminent 10.5.3 is released.