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Posts Tagged ‘backup’

What’s up with Backzup?

January 9, 2012 6 comments

On 14th December 2011 I signed up for a free 512Gb online backup account at Backzup. I was initially doubtful that the service could provide that amount of free backup, but it worked well. Backzup is (was?) a Livedrive re-seller, so the software you download is from Livedrive, and you use the Livedrive web site to manage or access your backup.

My reason for trying Backzup was a problem with my Carbonite account. I have used Carbonite for my online backup needs for over two years, and while the service has previously worked well I have now hit the point where Carbonite are throttling my backup so much it’s impossible to use. When I recently upgraded my server hackintosh I moved all the files from the old server to the new one using the Mac Migration Assistant. When I re-installed the Carbonite software on the new server and transfered the backup account the old backup set was retained, and a new one started. The backup set contains 189Gb, so the old 189Gb remained on the Carbonite servers and a new 189Gb backup was started. Carbonite slow down your backup once it gets too big, so mine is wallowing at around 300Gb with over 70Gb remaining. The upload speed is now limited to around 100kbit/second, so I am now waiting for 30 days since the old backup was last seen. At that time the old backup should be deleted, and I can finish the new backup in a reasonable time.

Backzup sounded like an ideal solution, offering 512Gb for free with no upload speed limits. I completed the initial backup of 204Gb in five days, which included suspending the backup a few times to do other things. The service then worked without issue until the 1st January 2012, when the Livedrive software reported it could not log into the account. My attempts to access the Livedrive web site returned a message that the account was suspended, but there is no way to contact Livedrive as I need to log into the account to access their support system. This happened at the point when I was considering upgrading to one of Backzup’s paid accounts, not for the extra space but to pay something for a good service. Read more…

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Hackintosh Software Updates

April 15, 2010 Leave a comment

It’s been a busy week for Snow Leopard updates, with the 10.6.3 V1.1 Combo Update closely followed by Security Update 2010-003. Both have been tested on three of my hackintosh machines, the original P35-DS3R hack, the Acer Aspire One hackbook and the as yet undocumented hackinfireplace. The only update that caused any issue was the last, requiring the AppleHDA.kext from 10.6.2 to be re-installed to get audio back. I had to do the same after the original 10.6.3 update so it wasn’t anything unexpected.

As usual backups of all three systems were made before installing updates. Where only one hard drive was available Disk Utility was used to resize the existing partition and add a new partition to the empty space, which then became the backup partition. It’s not as good as a separate hard drive but for a quick ‘just incase the update causes a problem’ backup it’s fine.

HD Holiday Workflow

April 17, 2009 Leave a comment

I recently returned to the UK after two weeks in San Francisco and Las Vegas. Unfortunately the free WiFi in the SF hotel was nowhere near as reliable as hoped with my Macbook so there were no updates while abroad. The hotel in Las Vegas wanted $15 a day for WiFi internet and while there are a few free access points (the two nearby Apple stores being the main ones) I didn’t want to spend my holiday lurking around these.

I now have a lot of photo’s and 1080p video to edit, and it’s a fairly straightforward task. I’ve listed my method here to help anyone else in the same position, as this is the easiest way of managing large AVCHD files I have found. Read more…

Hackintosh disaster recovery part 2

April 24, 2008 5 comments

In part one I looked at the steps I took to get my hackintosh working again after accidentally overwriting the boot information. The computer has been working fine for over three weeks since, and I haven’t found any side effects with software or hardware. My latest efforts have been focused on making bootable backups for use in the event of an unbootable hackintosh. Read more…

Hackintosh disaster recovery part 1

March 30, 2008 2 comments

If you use a Mac, making bootable backups are easy, and definitely easier than on a Windows Computer. Using software like Carbon Copy Cloner or Superduper you can clone your Mac’s hard drive to another internal or external USB/Firewire drive. This copy is an exact image of the original drive so you can boot from it and see no difference to using the source drive. Add in smart copies that only copy the changes since the last backup and you have a fast, reliable and easy backup system. Scheduled backups even mean you don’t have to remember to backup, just check it’s working as planed.

I used this method with my Macbook and felt a lot more relaxed making big changes to the system. Updating to 10.5.2 was easily reversible when the wireless networking stopped working. Even the Leopard upgrade from Tiger was no problem when I could easily revert to Tiger if a show stopper surfaced. This ease is one of the factors that made me move my daily computer use to Mac OS, but what happens when you build your own? Read more…

10.5.2 is finally here

February 11, 2008 Leave a comment

Software UpdateI know it’s only a software update, but this one has enough bug fixes and tweaks to justify a service pack 1 title. 10.5.2 is now available in software update as a substantial 341Mb download. Good job software update supports resuming as I would hate to get 99% of this and have to start again. I’ve stopped all other internet traffic on my network so I can get this asap, but it’s still a relatively slow download. More news on the changes once it’s installed, and don’t forget to back up all your valuable data before updating. I ran Superduper this morning so I have a bootable backup waiting if there are any problems.

Categories: apple, software Tags: , , , ,

Time Capsule first look

January 20, 2008 1 comment

Time CapsuleThe recently announced Time Capsule wireless router/NAS is due in February (in the UK) for £199 (500Gb) and £329 (1Tb). It’s stated to work with Macs using Time Machine and Windows PC’s as a shared drive, but there’s little info as yet on the interface and access controls. The current Airport Extreme offers users accounts with passwords for restricted access to files and folders, so Time Capsule should offer at least this.
Apple’s usual ease of use is pretty much a given, but does the package offer good value for money? A 500Gb Network Attached Storage box can be bought for £146.86 here. That leaves £53 for a wireless router. You can get a cheap ‘super G’ box for £20.56 here, but that’s not Draft-N standard. I couldn’t find any Draft-N routers that cheap, so the 500Gb Time Capsule at £199 looks like good value.
But what about the 1Tb version? The price difference between a bare 500Gb and 1Tb SATA hard drive is around £120 at the moment, but that’s for a standard drive. Apple states the Time Capsule contains a ‘server grade’ hard drive, so while the 1Tb Time Capsule doesn’t offer the same cost per Mb as the 500Mb unit, it is competitively priced.
Hopefully these boxes will encourage home users to start taking backups a bit more seriously. It’s fine having a computer that makes it easy to store thousands of songs and photo’s, and hundreds of hours of video, but the more it stores the bigger the shock when it all gets lost.