Archive

Posts Tagged ‘10.6’

Snow Leopard 10.6.1 update released

September 12, 2009 1 comment

Two weeks after Snow Leopard went on sale, Apple has released the first system update. 10.6.1. is described as containing ‘general operating system fixes that enhance the stability, compatibility and security of your Mac.’ Available now through Software Update or as a direct download, the 71.47Mb package is recommended for all Macintosh’s running Snow Leopard.

Advertisements

Snow Leopard Problems

August 31, 2009 6 comments

Snow_Leopard_Family_Pack

The first system I tried Snow Leopard on was my 1st generation Macbook. I expected some problems installing onto a hackintosh but all the reports I have read so far say the Leopard to Snow Leopard upgrade works just fine. Unfortunately this hasn’t been the case with my Macbook.

Before starting the upgrade I made a full backup to an external hard drive. The Snow Leopard upgrade is fairly straightforward, there are few options you can change now so it’s just a case of insert the DVD and go through the installer steps. After installation there were immediate problems visible, starting with many missing items at the right side of the menu bar. No time, no iStat menu’s and other items missing. I’ve since found out that iStat menu’s has problems with Snow Leopard, but trying to go into System Preferences> Date & Time>Clock just caused System Preferences to hang and needing a Force Quit. It looked like there was a conflict somewhere, so I tried again. Read more…

10.5.8 on Hackintosh

August 28, 2009 2 comments

Snow_Leopard_BoxSnow Leopard is released today which means the focus of the hackintosh scene will quickly shift to the latest release. I picked up my Copy of the Snow Leopard Family Pack on the way home from work today and will by attempting a hackintosh install over the weekend, as a fresh install. My three hackintosh’s will be staying as they are until all the bugs are ironed out and Snow leopard is stable on non-Apple hardware.

My main Hackintosh, based on a Gigabyte P32-DS3R motherboard and Intel Core 2 Quad 6600 processor, is running 10.5.8. I had a problem with sleep not resuming after the install, but a quick search of Insanelymac.com showed a perfect fix by deleting disabler.kext and IntelCPUPMDisabler.kext from the Extensions folder. The same didn’t work with my newest Intel Atom server Hackintosh, in the limited time I have had over the past two weeks I haven’t found a fix yet. The HThackintosh hasn’t been attempted yet, as this and the server are not routinely web browsing or doing any other risky activity. Also, by the time the eighth point update to an Apple OS is released the urgency to upgrade is wearing off. These machines may stay at 10.5.7 until the Snow Leopard on Hackintosh guides are well tested.

As I always say, don’t forget to make a backup before upgrading any system, Apple or not, to Snow Leopard. My Macbook is currently being backed up to an external USB drive using the excellent Carbon Copy Cloner, as soon as I have the option to restore to Leopard from a backup the newest big cat will be going on as an upgrade.

Hackintosh Atom server

July 27, 2009 3 comments

In a previous post I told the sorry tale of my Synology DS106e network attached storage box. It served me well for 18 months until the fan stopped working and a scheduled backup led to the hard drive overheating. It was time to upgrade my server, and there were several options available.

  1. Buy a replacement NAS box, either a newer Synology model or something similar from Qnap, Thecus, Netgear etc. This would cost anywhere from £70 for a used item on eBay to £300 for a top of the range home/soho device. The current Synology one drive budget NAS is around £180 online.
  2. Buy a used Mac Mini from eBay. The newer Core 2 Duo/solo models fetch a high price but the original G4 versions at 1.25 or 1.4Ghz are selling for around £120. Ready made server in a small and silent box, easy to setup and expand through software.
  3. Build a mini hackintosh based on an Intel Atom processor. This is perhaps the most flexible approach, is should be able to run Leopard and hopefully Snow Leopard. Linux and windows shouldn’t be a problem either, so it has plenty of options for software.

I decided to go for the third option, not really surprising since I have already built a Quad Core hackintosh and a Home Theatre hackintosh. Building something is usually more fun than buying a ready made device, although this depends on how well the end result works. With the decision made I started looking at the Insanelymac forums for details from people who had already used Atom processors. Read more…

Snow Leopard videos

June 27, 2009 Leave a comment

Mac OS 10.6 Snow Leopard has been marketed so far as a refinement of the existing 10.5 Leopard operating system, offering a smaller footprint and increased performance as opposed to lots of new features. That doesn’t mean there are no visible changes for the end user, as many components have seen additions and improvements in existing features. The video’s below show some of the improved interface elements in Snow Leopard.

The enhanced Dock ‘Stacks’ feature of Snow Leopard Read more…

What to expect from Snow Leopard

June 16, 2008 Leave a comment

Roughlydrafted.com have an interesting article looking at what you can expect to see from the next version of the Mac OS. As previously covered, Snow Leopard, or 10.6, will not add any major new features but instead concentrate on increasing speed and stability while reducing the size of the operating system. As they state in the article, this puts Apple in a strong position to go head to head with Microsoft, pitching 10.7 against Windows 7.

Read at Roughlydrafted.com

10.6 Snow Leopard page at Apple.com

June 10, 2008 Leave a comment

Wasting no time after yesterdays first details of the next version of its operating system, Apple has posted a Snow Leopard page at Apple.com. There’s nothing we haven’t already heard about 10.6, but it looks like Apple is keen to play the publicity game in the constant comparison with Windows.

Am I the only one who finds it strange that Apple are concentrating on speed, stability and reducing the size of the operating system at a time when Microsoft are starting to talk about new features? I can understand the reasoning for Apple’s choices, since a smaller OS X as used in the iPhone can power a range of consumer electronics, or portable devices using SSD’s. And if Snow Leopard lands in early 2009 there’s plenty of time for 10.7 in later 2010 to go head to head with Windows 7.