Archive

Archive for the ‘music’ Category

Plex 8

May 12, 2009 Leave a comment

PlexI’ve mentioned Plex before, a branch of the XBMC software on Macintosh. It’s my media centre of choice, running on the Home Theatre hackintosh I put together a few months ago.

Released a couple of days ago is Plex V8, first release of the new stable branch following on from the development seven series. Download the Mac OS Leopard only dmg , release notes and source code from here. There are several new features and lots of fixes so it’s worth giving Plex a try.

Plex_8

Categories: media, movie, music, software Tags: , , ,

iTunes updated to version 8.1

March 12, 2009 Leave a comment

itunesApple has today released an update to iTunes. Version 8.1 boasts several new features on top of the usual bug fixes, including importing CD’s at iTunes Plus quality (AAC, 256kbps) and Genius for Movies and TV shows. The best improvement for me so far has been the speed boost. iTunes now loads faster and syncing with my 1st Gen iPod Touch is noticeably quicker.

Also updated are Front Row and the iPhone/iPod iTunes remote adding iTunes 8.1 compatibility.

Hackintosh HTPC part 1

January 21, 2009 4 comments

For the past few year’s I’ve used an Xbox running Xbox Media Centre to play video files on a TV, streamed from first a Windows machine then a Synology file server. This setup is easy to use and picture quality is fine on a standard definition set. Mrs Basshead has recently become a lot more convinced of the need to upgrade to High Definition after watching a 40 inch Samsung 6 series for a while, so the second requirement (after buying a suitable LCD TV) is a HD capable media streamer. Read more…

Is Apple going DRM free?

December 9, 2008 Leave a comment

The biggest rumour of the day is that Apple will start offering music from all the major labels DRM free. Lots of sites are claiming this will start today, but Greg Sandoval of Cnet says the claims are bogus. That’s a shame, as the Amazon MP3 store has recently opened in the UK offering DRM free MP3 singles from 59p and albums from £3. I bought one for Mrs Basshead at the weekend and used Amazon’s download software to get a chart album in under a minute. This was one of the £3 albums in 256kbps MP3 format. Nice to see the download software is available for Mac and Linux as well as Windows.

Looks like Apple need to get their store in order pretty quick or Amazon and others are going to start clawing back part of the music download market.

The moral crossroads

December 2, 2008 Leave a comment

There are two kinds of government. One kind cares about it’s people, and the other treats them as cattle, little more than a resource. I know there are lots of terms for different systems of running everything from a community to a continent, but they all either care or they don’t.

Things have been changing in the UK for a while now, and I’m talking here about the mostly overlooked battle that’s being fought between content providers and anyone with a shred of care for the public. It surfaces occasionally with a sensationalist headline in the media, but the majority of UK citizens don’t realise what the Media corporations are up to. America already has the RIAA pursuing college file sharers and others for ridiculous sums of money using suspect evidence, and just like in many other ways the UK is becoming increasingly like the USA.

I remember having Disco’s and a Headmaster at my senior school, but it now has Prom’s and a Principal. Small changes I would happily live with if we didn’t have to suffer the same shift of power towards big business and the criminalisation of its customers. An article at Ars Technica got my attention and really brings together what’s happening at the moment. It’s a complicated issue that I won’t repeat here, but none of it benefits anyone but the Music corporations and shareholders. Will the artists who create the product see a big improvement in royalties and treatment? By the time the executives and lawyers take their share I doubt there will be much left for those that generate the money.

As the Ars article points out, there are opponents of the Media interests, such as the Open Rights Group. It’s reasuring that someone is fighting for the rights of the public, even if it isn’t our Government. And the question is, why not? Why are ISP’s, Media companies and civil rights groups being left to fight it out? I could almost think ministers don’t want to get involved in an argument that will eventually anger big money or the general public. Or maybe it’s because they don’t really understand this ‘internet’ thing and don’t realise that current teenagers grew up with file sharing an accepted part of social networking.

The thing is, it’s not just the British government that don’t seem to understand the internet. Media companies still try to restrict us with DRM crippled products that are limited to compatible devices and frequently in working life. Some are embracing DRM free media as the way forward, while others desperately cling to the old business models that worked so well before the world got connected. There are new ways of selling content being dreamed up all the time, and some are promising. I’ve written about the subscription model before, where we would all pay a set fee each month and download (and keep) whatever we want from authorised servers of high quality media. Ars mentions the survey where the University of Hertfordshire asked P2P users if they would pay for a legal file sharing service, and 80% said yes. That’s a huge amount of extra legal money for the artists.

The question here isn’t would it work, it’s why isn’t it being worked on now. The UK has the BBC, a corporation that takes our license fee for what now amounts to a much smaller proportion of the total available content. I’m not disputing the quality of content, but if we have an infrastructure to collect and monitor the paying of this fee to one body, why can’t we have one that monitors all content and dishes out the money as appropriate? Would it have anything to do with a loss of power for the few big Media Corporations?

This all comes back to my opening statement that Governments either care or they don’t. They should care enough to stop us becoming a resource for the Big Money’s legal departments. They should care enough to stop our children’s mistakes and habits become obscene legal bills. And they should care enough about the artists to give them a fair deal.

America has a new President Elect who promises a fairer, people centric future. Maybe we could have one of those in the UK.

And a final though. The Federation Against Software Theft is calling for ten years imprisonment if convicted of online commercial piracy. A longer prison sentence for software piracy than rape and murder? Aren’t the priorities getting mixed up here?

iTunes 8 genius feature screenshots

September 10, 2008 Leave a comment

The biggest new feature of iTunes 8 is the genius, which works like online services Pandora and LastFM to recommend similar music in the iTunes store, and create smart playlists using the songs you already have. iTunes 8 is a 58.4Mb download available now from the Apple website or through Software Update.

Read more…

Categories: apple, itunes, music Tags: , ,

iPhone 2.1 firmware on September 9th?

September 6, 2008 Leave a comment

Most news sites have now settled on iTunes 8 being announced at the September 9th special event. The latest rumours are now suggesting iPhone firmware 2.1 will also be released, but with a few unexpected extra’s. No word on what they are, but ArsTechnica are pretty confident there’s something new coming. Could this finally be copy/paste support?

Further leaked images are suggesting the previous iPod Nano images were real,so what else will be announced? Ipod Touch updates are a good bet as are price reductions or capacity boosts on the other models, but Apple is sure to have something that isn’t expected. Although the rumoured subscription service would certainly surprise, knowing Apple there’s something coming that no-one has thought of. News on the Macbook refresh has been absent for a while now, so will this be it? I’m hoping the laptop announcements are made later in the month and there’s something new unveiled.

Apple announces Sept 9th special event

September 2, 2008 Leave a comment

ArsTechnica has the news that Apple has announced a special event on September 9th, as was predicted by several sources recently. The focus appears to be the iPod, though some sites are speculating that the rumoured Macbook refresh may also be part of the event. I’m leaning more toward the music subscription service myself, as Nokia is bringing its ‘Comes With Music’ service to the UK this autumn. Other vendors have tried the subscription model with limited success, so if anyone can make it work it’s Apple.

Pirate songs and the ISP pays?

August 13, 2008 Leave a comment

Paidcontent:UK is reporting that a major UK ISP is planning to monitor it’s customers illegal music downloads and reimburse record companies. The article suggests Virgin Media will be using ‘deep packet inspection’ technology from Playlouder to monitor what songs are downloaded, and customers who pay an additional fee will be allowed to download as much as they want from P2P sources.

The story raises a lot more questions than it answers, but that may be the point. I will certainly be interested to hear how this will work, as it would be an interesting alternative to criminalisation of a large slice of the UK’s internet users.

Read the article at Paidcontent:UK

Comments at Ars Technica

First stage of the UK filesharing clampdown

July 24, 2008 Leave a comment

Following the recent news that Virgin Media had sent 800 of its customers warning letters concerning their illegal sharing of music, the BPI has announced today a deal with the six largest UK ISP’s. BT, Virgin, Orange, Tiscali, BSkyB and Carphone Warehouse have agreed to send warning letters to customers that the BPI identifies as illegally sharing or downloading music. The warning is as far as any of the companies involved are prepared to go at the moment. General opinion on tech news sites is that this is fine if it’s the only action to be taken, but most believe it’s only the first step.

The stated aim of the agreement is to significantly reduce the amount of illegal file sharing taking place in the UK. I suspect a lot of parents will be shocked to receive their letters and have to look at what their children are using the net connection for. I’ve already been asked by several concerned and computer inexperienced parents what this means and what they can do.

The next step will depend on the resultant reduction in file sharing and how far the record companies want to go to recover their ‘estimated’ losses. Some ridiculous figures have been mentioned today on the UK’s news services, but the thing to remember is that no-one really knows how much money is lost to illegal file sharing, and there have been plenty of studies that claim illegal file sharers buy more music. I suspect that an immediate stop to music piracy wouldn’t result in the predicted massive jump in profits. The saddest thing is that none of these companies appear to be actively looking for new ways of making people want to buy music, other than the usual threat of legal force. Are record companies that persue file sharers for losses really recovering lost profit, or making money they otherwise would not have seen?