Archive

Archive for the ‘backup’ Category

MobileMe – what .Mac should have been

June 9, 2008 Leave a comment

The last major announcement of the WWDC was the new MobileMe service, replacing .Mac from July. Offering a web interface to mail, calendars and contacts with a familiar Mac app appearance, the impressive thing about this is the ability to synchronise or push information across iPhone, iPod, Mac (ical, mail, address book) and Windows Outlook. Syncing of photo’s is also supported, and Apple describes this as ‘Exchange for the rest of us’. Storage of 20Gb is included. Priced at $99 a year it looks like a much better service than .Mac, and should do much to revive Apple’s flagging web service. More information here.

10.5.3 hackintosh problems

May 30, 2008 3 comments

I had a try at upgrading my hackintosh earlier today using the Kalyway 10.5.3 combo update followed by the Kalyway 10.5.3 kernel update. All looked good until I tried using spaces which jerked about horribly. A look at the System Profiler shows Core Image running in software and no Quartz Extreme. Looks like the install screwed the display drivers. Lots of hackintosh owners are having the same problem over at OSX86, so it’s time to trawl the forums until someone figures out a fix. It’s time like this I’m glad I backed everything up before the upgrade.

10.5.3 released

May 29, 2008 Leave a comment

The Leopard 10.5.3 update is available now in Software Update. My Macbook is currently being backed up using SuperDuper, then 10.5.3 goes on for testing. If I get time I will try applying the update to one of my hackintosh test partitions to see how that goes. Fingers crossed the networking issues are finally sorted out for everyone, and hopefully Leopard will now be the (relatively) bug free OS we wanted.

UPDATE

The Macbook update worked fine, and it’s now showing my iPod Touch and hackintosh in the Finder sidebar. Trying to update the test partition on the hackintosh crashed the install and it’s now not bootable. Looks like I’ll have to wait for the hacked version of the software updater.

Flash Memory prices

May 24, 2008 Leave a comment

It’s holiday season again, the time of year when I look at the gadgets and memory cards that will accompany me on my travels. For my recent week in Italy I took a Sanyo Xacti HD2 for photo and video capture, two 4Gb SDHC cards to record to and my Macbook to transfer everything to every night. A 60Gb portable hard drive backup up what was on the Macbook, so I had a fairly bombproof system of storing my holiday snaps.

The Macbook was a bit of a problem though. It’s a large chunk of the hand luggage weight allowance on flights, and the Hotel we stayed in didn’t have large safe boxes. There was only one safe in which you could have an A4 envelope stored. Fine for passports and money, no good for a laptop so the Macbook was hidden in the room every day while we were out. There was no accessible WiFi internet either, so taking the Macbook was a bit of overkill for what it did.

For my next trip to Spain at the start of June I’m debating leaving the Macbook at home, and the deciding factor will be if there is internet access so I can update this site while sitting around the pool. If the Macbook stays at home, my 8Gb of SDHC storage may not be enough for video. So the next question is, how much have memory cards fallen in price? Read more…

Hackintosh disaster recovery part 2

April 24, 2008 5 comments

In part one I looked at the steps I took to get my hackintosh working again after accidentally overwriting the boot information. The computer has been working fine for over three weeks since, and I haven’t found any side effects with software or hardware. My latest efforts have been focused on making bootable backups for use in the event of an unbootable hackintosh. Read more…

Hackintosh disaster recovery part 1

March 30, 2008 2 comments

If you use a Mac, making bootable backups are easy, and definitely easier than on a Windows Computer. Using software like Carbon Copy Cloner or Superduper you can clone your Mac’s hard drive to another internal or external USB/Firewire drive. This copy is an exact image of the original drive so you can boot from it and see no difference to using the source drive. Add in smart copies that only copy the changes since the last backup and you have a fast, reliable and easy backup system. Scheduled backups even mean you don’t have to remember to backup, just check it’s working as planed.

I used this method with my Macbook and felt a lot more relaxed making big changes to the system. Updating to 10.5.2 was easily reversible when the wireless networking stopped working. Even the Leopard upgrade from Tiger was no problem when I could easily revert to Tiger if a show stopper surfaced. This ease is one of the factors that made me move my daily computer use to Mac OS, but what happens when you build your own? Read more…

Time Capsule first look

January 20, 2008 1 comment

Time CapsuleThe recently announced Time Capsule wireless router/NAS is due in February (in the UK) for £199 (500Gb) and £329 (1Tb). It’s stated to work with Macs using Time Machine and Windows PC’s as a shared drive, but there’s little info as yet on the interface and access controls. The current Airport Extreme offers users accounts with passwords for restricted access to files and folders, so Time Capsule should offer at least this.
Apple’s usual ease of use is pretty much a given, but does the package offer good value for money? A 500Gb Network Attached Storage box can be bought for £146.86 here. That leaves £53 for a wireless router. You can get a cheap ‘super G’ box for £20.56 here, but that’s not Draft-N standard. I couldn’t find any Draft-N routers that cheap, so the 500Gb Time Capsule at £199 looks like good value.
But what about the 1Tb version? The price difference between a bare 500Gb and 1Tb SATA hard drive is around £120 at the moment, but that’s for a standard drive. Apple states the Time Capsule contains a ‘server grade’ hard drive, so while the 1Tb Time Capsule doesn’t offer the same cost per Mb as the 500Mb unit, it is competitively priced.
Hopefully these boxes will encourage home users to start taking backups a bit more seriously. It’s fine having a computer that makes it easy to store thousands of songs and photo’s, and hundreds of hours of video, but the more it stores the bigger the shock when it all gets lost.