Home > hackintosh, macintosh > Hackintosh part 7

Hackintosh part 7

GaragebandI had a play with Garageband yesterday to test the hackintosh audio input, and I’m happy to report the MIC input is working fine. I made myself a mono ¼ inch to stereo 3.5mm cable and plugged my bass straight into the computer. Nice clean sound, and like many other aspects of this build it just worked. Many forum reports say it’s possible to get the digital output working if you want surround sound, but I’m not concerned with that at the moment.

The other area I started experimenting in was overclocking. From the default 2.4Ghz of the Q6600 I am currently running at a stable 3Ghz using only the Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro. The CPU appears to be multiplier locked at 9x so the only way to increase the speed is to increase the FSB. I have mine at 333Mhz for 9×333=3Ghz. The GA-P35-DS3R bios has an option to automatically control CPU and chipset voltages so I didn’t have to worry about raising these to get the board stable.

I took the speed up in two steps, and used geekbench and xbench to get some idea of the boost in performance this gives. The table below shows the results.

CPU speed
Geekbench
xBench
xBench CPU only
2.4Ghz
4809
144
151
2.7Ghz
5343
151
170
3.0Ghz
5987
160
188

Geekbench is a CPU only benchmark aimed at comparing raw processor speed across a number of operating systems. A 25% CPU speed increase from 2.4 to 3.0Ghz gives a 24.5% performance increase using geekbench. That’s a pretty linear result that I wasn’t expecting to see, suggesting nothing else is slowing the CPU. xBench looks at all the components that effect a computer’s performance including hard disk and graphics card, so the overall increase is much lower. Here, a 25% CPU speed increase delivers an overall 11% improvement. If we exclude the rest of the components and just look at the CPU, the speed gain is 24.5%.

That’s an impressive overclock for a £150 processor, and many forum posts suggest it can be pushed a lot further. I’m not an extreme overclocker so I think 4x3Ghz cores is fairly respectable, especially since that’s faster than the default speed of the Core 2 Quad Extreme QX6800, a processor selling for £611 at Scan.

Hackintosh Part 1

Hackintosh Part 2

Hackintosh Part 3

Hackintosh part 4

Hackintosh part 5

Hackintosh part 6

Hackintosh part 8

Hackintosh part 9

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